How to deal with relationship breakups

How To Handle A Breakup: 10 Do’s and 5 Don’ts | Thought Catalog

how to deal with relationship breakups

Whether the relationship lasted three weeks or three years, breakups can leave us feeling heartbroken, lost and even physically ill. Surviving a relationship break-up can be one of the most difficult things we ever People are not well equipped to deal with break-ups, because we rarely are. Most people will experience feelings of deep loss and distress after a long-term relationship breakup. from wagtailfarm.info

As well as grieving the loss of your relationship, you may feel confused, isolated, and fearful about the future. But there are plenty of things you can do to cope with the pain, get through this difficult time, and even move on with a renewed sense of hope and optimism. Why are breakups so painful?

how to deal with relationship breakups

Even when a relationship is no longer good, a divorce or breakup can be extremely painful because it represents the loss, not just of the partnership, but also of the dreams and commitments you shared. Romantic relationships begin on a high note of excitement and hopes for the future. When a relationship fails, we experience profound disappointment, stress, and grief.

A breakup or divorce launches you into uncharted territory. A breakup also brings uncertainty about the future. What will life be like without your partner?

Will you find someone else? Will you end up alone?

Coping with a break-up

These unknowns can often seem worse than being in an unhappy relationship. This pain, disruption, and uncertainty means that recovering from a breakup or divorce can be difficult and take time. You may also feel anxious about the future. Accept that reactions like these will lessen over time. Even if the relationship was unhealthy, venturing into the unknown is frightening. Give yourself a break. Give yourself permission to feel and to function at a less than optimal level for a period of time.

No one is superman or superwoman; take time to heal, regroup, and re-energize. Sharing your feelings with friends and family can help you get through this period. Consider joining a support group where you can talk to others in similar situations. Isolating yourself can raise your stress levels, reduce your concentration, and get in the way of your work, other relationships, and overall health.

Mental Health America Allow yourself to grieve the loss of the relationship Grief is a natural reaction to loss, and the breakup or divorce of a love relationship involves multiple losses: Loss of companionship and shared experiences which may or may not have been consistently pleasurable Loss of support, be it financial, intellectual, social, or emotional Loss of hopes, plans, and dreams which can be even more painful than practical losses Allowing yourself to feel the pain of these losses may be scary.

Just remember that grieving is essential to the healing process. The pain of grief is precisely what helps you let go of the old relationship and move on. Tips for grieving after a breakup or divorce: While these emotions will often be painful, trying to suppress or ignore them will only prolong the grieving process.

Dealing with a Breakup or Divorce

If these statistics were to take into account the number of nonmarital long-term relationships that end, then the statistics would be much higher. Most of us experience a relationship breakup at some point in our lives. For some of us, the experience may be most profound when we lose our first love. For some, the loss of a first love is also the first time the physical and psychological symptoms of grief and loss are experienced.

A romantic relationship that has spanned a considerable time decades in some cases also provokes intense feelings of losseven when people knew their relationship was problematic. They may have found their relationship dissatisfying and view their former partner as insensitive, selfish, argumentative — even unloving - and still mourn the loss of it.

The science of romance — can we predict a breakup?

Coping with a break-up | Romantic relationships | ReachOut Australia

Why do we experience feelings of loss after breakup? During the adult years, our romantic partners hold a special significance — a significance that was once held by our parents or parent-like figures.

how to deal with relationship breakups

Our romantic partners become the primary people we turn to for love, comfort, and security. Above anyone else, we turn to our partners for care and support in times of threat and distress. We also turn to them for validation and to share in our success during times of joy and achievement. Instead of restricting calories, eat nourishing whole foods that are high in fiber, protein and nutrients to boost your mood and energy.

A balanced diet with plenty of fresh fruits, greens and stress-busting superfoods can help counteract the physiological stress of the breakup, says Meyers. Another important thing, Meyers notes, is to avoid mindless eating and try not to turn food as a coping mechanism. Don't worry about indulging a little, but try not to keep too much junk food around, as foods that are high in fat, sugar and salt can actually contribute to higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol.

how to deal with relationship breakups

Get Active But Don't Over-Exercise Getting your endorphins pumping through cardio exercise is often prescribed as a way to get over a breakup, and for good reason: Going for a run or hitting the elliptical can lower your stress levelsimprove cognitive functioning and boost your mood -- in addition to providing a healthy distraction from your worries. Even if exercising is the last thing you want to do, the act of simply getting out of your head and focusing your awareness on your body can be helpful.

Like over-eating or excessively dieting, exercise can become a compulsive behavior. Get active in a way that you enjoy and that doesn't feel like a punishment, whether it's early-morning jogs in the park, zumba or hot yoga -- all the better when accompanied by friends. Painful breakups can cloud your thinking so that it's almost impossible to look beyond the immediate feelings of pain and loss.

Dealing with a Breakup or Divorce - wagtailfarm.info

You may have trouble remembering all the things you appreciate because you're so focused on the negative. Practicing gratitude can help to even out your moods and get you get back into a more positive headspace. Studies have shown that listing things you're thankful for can boost your well-being and brighten your outlook on life. Meyers suggests keeping a gratitude journal to help turn your attention to the positive.

You may initially have to force yourself to think of things you're grateful for, but as you repeat the process, the bad won't feel so all-consuming anymore.